New PDF release: Beyond the Rubicon: Romans and Gauls in Republican Italy

By J. H. C. Williams

ISBN-10: 0198153007

ISBN-13: 9780198153009

ISBN-10: 1423785762

ISBN-13: 9781423785767

Through the center and overdue Republican sessions (fourth to first centuries BC) the Romans lived in worry and loathing of the Gauls of northern Italy, prompted basically by way of their collective old reminiscence of the destruction of the town of Rome by means of Gauls in 387 BC. through analyzing the literary proof in terms of the ancient, ethnographic, and geographic writings of Greeks and Romans of the interval focussing on invasion and clash, this ebook makes an attempt to respond to the questions how and why the Gauls grew to become the lethal enemy of the Romans. Dr. Williams additionally examines the problematical concept of the Gauls as 'Celts' which has been so influential in old and archaeological debts of northern Italy within the past due pre-Roman Iron Age via sleek students. The e-book concludes that historical literary facts and glossy ethnic presumptions approximately 'Celts' usually are not a valid foundation for reconstructing both the heritage of the Romans' interplay with the peoples of northern Italy or for analyzing the fabric facts.

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Download PDF by J. H. C. Williams: Beyond the Rubicon: Romans and Gauls in Republican Italy

In the course of the center and overdue Republican classes (fourth to first centuries BC) the Romans lived in worry and loathing of the Gauls of northern Italy, triggered essentially by way of their collective old reminiscence of the destruction of town of Rome through Gauls in 387 BC. through reading the literary proof with regards to the ancient, ethnographic, and geographic writings of Greeks and Romans of the interval focussing on invasion and clash, this booklet makes an attempt to reply to the questions how and why the Gauls turned the lethal enemy of the Romans.

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16. 13–15. 24 Hdt. 3. 115 denies that there was a large river flowing into the northern sea called Eridanus which was the source of amber, on the grounds that the name itself was Greek, not barbarian, and made up by some poet. Aeschylus, Heliades fr. 107 Mette, on the other hand, seems to have identified it with the Rhodanus, and placed it in Iberia. He was followed in this by the Hellenistic writer, Philostephanus of Cyrene: see Müller 1849: 32. fr. 22; cf. Timpe 1989: 315–16. See Chevallier 1980a: 8–12 for a list of Greek references to northern Italy.

7. 9–10; Claudius Quadrigarius fr. 10b Peter; Corvus: L. 7. 26. 1–10; Claudius Quadrigarius fr. 12 Peter; Decius Mus: L. 10. 26–30. Marcellus: Plut. Marc. 7–8. 78 Pol. 6. 53–4. 42 The Discovery of Celtic Italy been preserved, to be used extensively and perhaps uncritically by later Roman historians: Livy and Cicero both comment on the inherent unreliability of funeral speeches and the inscriptions on imagines (‘busts of ancestors’) as sources. 79 Livy attributes the motivation behind this tendency to straightforward mendaciousness, but there was more to it than that.

763 ff. on the geographical horizon of 3rd-cent.  Alexandria and its western limitations. 43 Cf. Posidonius FGH 87f15–18, 31–3, 55–6; and Edelstein and Kidd 1989, frr. 67–9, 272–6 for the fragments of his accounts of Celtic ethnography and the Cimbric invasion; with Tierney 1960. 44 There being no similar development in the West, the expansion of literary interest in the region was commensurately less. 45 In the late third century  Sotion of Alexandria wrote something about barbarian philosophers among the Celts, called druides and semnotheoi, but little seems to have been known about them.

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Beyond the Rubicon: Romans and Gauls in Republican Italy (Oxford Classical Monographs) by J. H. C. Williams


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